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Eid Mubarak Greetings

Eid Mubarak (Arabic: عيد مبارك‎, Bengali: ঈদ মোবারক, Persian/Urdu: عید مُبارک) is a traditional Muslim greeting reserved for use on the festivals of Eid ul-Adha and Eid ul-Fitr. The phrase translates into English as “blessed festival”, and can be paraphrased as “may you enjoy a blessed festival”. Muslims wish each other Eid Mubarak after performing the Eid prayer. This celebration continues until the end of the day for Eid ul-Fitr (or al-Fitr) and continues a further three days for Eid ul-Adha (or Al-Adha). However, in the social sense people usually celebrate that idfs the Eid ul-Fitr in the same length as Eid ul-Adha, such as family visits, and exchange greetings, such as “Eid Mubarak”. It is notable that saying these exact words is a cultural tradition influenced by deep roots of religion; however, it is not part of any religious obligations. Speakers of Arabic might also add “kul ‘am wantum bikhair.” Which means “[May] you be well every year”

Eid refers to the occasion itself, and Mubarak means ‘Blessed’.

Throughout the Muslim world there are numerous other ways of greeting for Eid ul-Adha and Eid ul-Fitr. The Companions of the Islamic prophet Muhammad used to say to each other when they met on Eid ul-Fitr:

Taqabbalallâhu minnâ wa minkum Which means “[May] God accepts from us and from you”[citation needed] which means “may God accept from us and you [our fasts and deeds]”.

An exception to this use in the Muslim world is Turkey where ‘Eid Mubarak’ is not common at all. Instead, a synonymous phrase “Bayramınız mübarek olsun” is used, alongside with its more Turkicized counterpart, “Bayramınız kutlu olsun”, both meaning exactly the same: “May your holiday be blessed”. In Pashtun areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan, the Pashto Akhtar de nekmregha sha, meaning “may your festival be blessed” is common.

(source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eid_Mubarak)

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