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In addition to weight loss, multiple scientific studies confirm that Wu-Long Slimming Tea:   1 – Clears Up Skin Conditions & Gives Your Face a Healthy Blemish-Free Glow Researchers from Japan’s Shiga University of Medical Science found that drinking Wu-Long Tea daily clears up skin within as few as 30 days. (Source: Archives of Dermatology) 2 – Reverses Signs ...
  • Baghdad – Iraq

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    Baghdad Mosque

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    Baghdad Landscape

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    Haifa Street

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    Baghdad Loc

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    Residential Buildings

    [Contributed By: User- Ateeq Ahmed Siddiqu on 01.01.2013]

    Baghdad Mosque Baghdad Landscape Haifa Street Baghdad Loc Residential Buildings
  • Twin Turtles

     

     

    Two Heads on same side

    Heads on Opposite sides

    Two Heads on same side

     

    Two Heads on same side

    An aquarium in East Norriton, Pennsylvania, displayed a red-earned slider turtle that had two heads. The reptilian oddity had a pair of front feet on each side, but just one pair of back feet and only one tail.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

        Two Heads on same side Heads on Opposite sides Two Heads on same side   Two Heads on same side An aquarium in East Norriton, Pennsylvania, displayed a red-earned slider turtle that had two heads. The reptilian oddity had a pair of front feet on each side, but just one pair of back feet and only one tail.                  
  • Qutub Minar

    The Qutub Minar (Urdu: قطب مینار) is a tower located in Delhi, India. It is the world’s tallest brick minaret with a height of 72.5 meters (237.8 ft). Construction commenced by Qutb-ud-din Aibak who won Delhi from Prithviraj under Muhammad Ghori as his commander in chief, and finished by Iltutmish. The Qutub Minar is notable for being one of the earliest and most prominent examples of Indo-Islamic architecture. It is surrounded by several other ancient and medieval structures and ruins, collectively known as Qutub complex.

    Structure Of Qutub Minar

    Qutub Minar in red and buff sandstone is the highest tower in India . projected balcony encircling the Minar and supported by stone brackets, which are decorated with honeycomb design, more conspicuously in the first story.

    Inspired by the Minaret of Jam in Afghanistan and wishing to surpass it, Qutb-ud-din Aibak, the first Muslim ruler of Delhi, commenced construction of the Qutub Minar in 1193; but conical]] shafts, separated by balconies carried on Muqarnas corbels[citation needed]. The minaret is made of fluted red sandstone covered with intricate carvings and verses from the Qur’an. Numerous inscriptions in Arabic and Nagari characters in different places of the Minar reveal the history of Qutb. According to the inscriptions on its surface it was repaired by Firoz Shah Tughlaq (AD 1351-88) and Sikandar Lodi (AD 1489-1517).

    Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque, to the northeast of Minar was built by Qutbu’d-Din Aibak in AD 1198. It is the earliest mosque built by the Delhi Sultans. It consists of a rectangular courtyard enclosed by cloisters, erected with the carved columns and architectural members of 27 Hindu and Jain temples[citation needed], Later, a coffee arched screen was erected and the mosque was enlarged,by Shams ud Din Iltutmish (AD 1210-35) and Allaud-din Khilji. The Iron Pillar in the courtyard bears an inscription in Sanskrit in Brahmi script of 4th century AD, according to which the pillar was set up as a Vishnudhvaja (standard of Lord Vishnu) on the hill known as Vishnupada in memory of a mighty king named Chandra. A deep socket on the top of the ornate capital indicates that probably an image of Garuda was fixed into it.it is situated in delhi.

    The Qutub Minar comprises several superposed flanged and cylindrical shafts, separated by balconies carried on Muqarnas corbels. The minaret is made of fluted red sandstone covered with intricate carvings and verses from the Qur’an. The Qutub Minar is itself built on the ruins of the Lal Kot, the Red Citadel in the city of Dhillika, the capital of the Tomars and the Chauhans, the last Hindu rulers of Delhi. The complex initially housed 27 ancient Hindu and Jain temples, which were destroyed and their debris used to build the Qutub minar. One engraving on the Qutub Minar reads, “Shri Vishwakarma prasade rachita” (Conceived with the grace of Vishwakarma.)

    The purpose for building this monument has been variously speculated upon. Some say the minaret was used to calling people for prayer in the Quwwat-ul-Islam mosqueoffer prayer but it is so tall that you can’t hear the person standing on the top. The earliest extant mosque built by the Delhi Sultans. Many historians believe that the Qutub Minar was named after the first Turkish sultan (whose descendant- Wajid Ali Shah-repaired it), Qutub-ud-din Aibak,[2] but others contend that it was named in honour of Qutubuddin Bakhtiar Kaki, a saint from Transoxiana who came to live in India and was greatly venerated by Iltutmish.

    The nearby Iron Pillar is one of the world’s foremost metallurgical curiosities, standing in the famous Qutub complex. According to the traditional belief, anyone who can encircle the entire column with their arms, with their back towards the pillar, can have their wish granted. Because of the corrosive qualities of sweat the government has built a fence around it for safety.

    The minar did receive some damage because of earthquakes and lightnings on more than a couple of occasions but was reinstated and renovated by the respective rulers. During the rule of Firoz Shah, the minar’s two top floors were damaged due to lightning but were repaired by Firoz Shah. In the year 1505, an earthquake struck and it was repaired by Sikandar Lodi. Later on in the year 1794, the minar faced another earthquake and it was Major Smith, an engineer who repaired the affected parts of the minar. He replaced Firoz Shah’s pavilion with his own pavilion at the top. The pavilion was removed in the year 1848 by Lord Hardinge and now it can be seen between the Dak Bungalow and the Minar in the garden. The floors built by Firoz Shah can be distinguished easily as the pavilions was built of white marbles and are quite smooth as compared to other ones.

    Gallery Of Qutub Minar

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    (source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qutb_Minar)

    The Qutub Minar (Urdu: قطب مینار) is a tower located in Delhi, India. It is the world’s tallest brick minaret with a height of 72.5 meters (237.8 ft). Construction commenced by Qutb-ud-din Aibak who won Delhi from Prithviraj under Muhammad Ghori as his commander in chief, and finished by Iltutmish. The Qutub Minar is notable ...
  • The other side

    The other side of the story …………A voyaging ship was wrecked during a storm at sea and only two of the men on it were able to swim to a small, desert like island. The two survivors, not knowing what else to do, agree that they had no other recourse but to pray to God. However, to find out whose prayer was more powerful, they agreed to divide the territory between them and stay on opposite sides of the island.The first thing they prayed for was food. The next morning, the first man saw a fruit-bearing tree on his side of the land and he was able to eat it’s fruit. The other man’s parcel of land remained barren!

    After a week, the first man was lonely and he decided to pray for a wife. The next day, there was a woman who swam to his side of the land. On the other side of the island, again there was nothing!

    Soon the first man prayed for a house, clothes, more food. The next day, like magic, all of these were given to him. However, the second man still had nothing!

    Finally, the first man prayed for a ship, so that he and his wife could  leave the island. In the morning, he found a ship docked at his side of the island. The first man boarded the ship with his wife and decided to leave the second man on the island. He considered the other man unworthy to receive God’s blessings, since none of his prayers had been answered.

    As the ship was about to leave, the first man heard a voice from heaven booming, “Why are you leaving your companion on the island?”

    “My blessings are mine alone, since I was the one who prayed for them,” the first man answered. “His prayers were all unanswered and so he does not deserve anything.”


    “You are mistaken!” the voice rebuked him. “He had only one prayer,  which I answered. If not for that, you would not have received any of my blessings.”

    “Tell me, O God,” the first man asked the voice, “What did he pray for that I should owe him anything?”

    He prayed that all your prayers be answered.

    For all we know, our blessings are not the fruits of our prayers alone,  but those of another praying for us.

    My prayer for you today is that all your prayers are answered. Be blessed.

    “What you do for others is more important than what you do for yourself”

    (contributed by: Mohan Rao on 15.09.2011)

     

     



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